Shopping Cart Summary
Your cart is currently empty.

Category Archives: Pet Care

Tips to Get Your Pet to Love Their New Bed

heated dog bedYou’ve just purchased a soft and cuddly heated pet bed from CozyWinters to replace the one your dog or cat recently wore out. You’re sure your pet will eventually come to love the new bed because of its temperature controlled warming pad and three-walled design, but for now the trick is getting him to try it. Fortunately, you don’t have to call in a professional dog whisperer to solve this problem; just give the following ideas a shot instead:

  • Place the new bed in the same location as the old one, or, alternatively, put it where you would like your dog to sleep from now on. Then let your dog discover and explore it on his own, and reward him with treats whenever he climbs in.
  • If your dog is wholly uninterested in the new bed or refuses to stay in it for more than a couple of minutes, resist the temptation to physically force him by pushing, dragging, or picking him up and setting him in. This will make the bed seem like an area for punishment rather than a safe haven.
  • To make the bed more comforting and inviting, place favorite toys, blankets, and other familiar objects in it. As an added enticement and to provide an extra sense of security, try putting one of your unlaundered t-shirts in the bed too.
  • If after a few days your dog still hasn’t taken to his new bed, it might be time to dispense with the subtlety and lure him in by putting treats or snacks directly on the cushion.

Depending on your dog’s personality and preferences, it could take anywhere from a few minutes to a few days or more to get him to love his new heated pet bed from CozyWinters. But with some patience and strategic use of the tips listed here, you can help him reach that point sooner rather than later—to the benefit of both of you.

How to Choose the Right Heated Pet Bed

Buying a heated pet bed for your dog or cat is an effective and affordable solution to keeping your furry companion warm throughout the winter months. But with so many terrific CozyWinters products to choose from, it can be a bit overwhelming for you as a first-time buyer to select the best one. That’s why we’ve put together this brief guide of key points to bear in mind as you shop our site.


Location

cat bedOne important consideration is where the pet bed will be used. Beds designed for outdoor use, including the Thermo-Doggy Cuddle Cushion and the Thermo-Kitty Sleephouse Cat Bed rely on electricity to generate heat, and therefore must be located near a 120V power supply. Indoor beds, on the other hand, may use special insulation to absorb and reradiate heat from your pet’s body without the need for electricity. Examples of self-warming beds include our Lounge Sleeper Dog Bed and Nuzzle Nest pet bed.

kh-1070-1090_HMaterial

Pet beds tend to be made of materials such as fleece, microsuede, memory foam, nylon, or heavy-duty vinyl, and may come with a removable cover that can be machine-washed. We suggest choosing a more durable material if you plan to use the bed outdoors or if your pet typically exhibits destructive chewing/clawing behavior. You can go with softer materials for indoor use, or select memory foam for older pets with arthritis or mobility issues.

Pet Bed Warmers

kh-002-004_BIf your dog or cat already has a favorite bed and is unlikely to be receptive to a new one, you can try using a simple bed warmer instead. This kind of product, which is available in four different sizes, runs on electricity and can be placed under the top cover of an existing pet bed to add warmth when needed.

In addition to the above points, don’t forget to examine the size and style of the prospective bed to ensure that your pet will have plenty of room to get comfortable and that it will be able to climb in and out easily.

Now that you have a better idea of what to look for in a heated pet bed, visit CozyWinters.com today to check out our entire line of warming products for dogs and cats.

Tips for Preventing and Removing Pet Hair Buildup

A pet can be a wonderful addition to any family. Dogs, cats, and other furry critters make for extremely loyal companions that bring unbounded joy, love, and energy into your home.

Unfortunately, they also bring a decent amount of hair and dander as well, which can make a mess of furniture and carpets or exacerbate allergies. To stop the inevitable shedding from overtaking your home, here are some important tips on how to prevent and remove pet hair buildup:

  • dog on couch pet hairTo stop pet hair from getting on your most expensive pieces of furniture, cover those items with fitted slipcovers or restrict access to the room by closing the door or installing a baby gate.
  • Provide your pet with its own bed to help reduce the temptation to jump on the sofa or recliner. Heated dog beds, cat beds, and pet mats with washable fleece covers are a comfy and affordable alternative.
  • Invest in a good vacuum cleaner with strong suctioning power that is rated for pet hair pickup. When vacuuming carpets, go over each area at least two times in different directions to help loosen and remove hair.
  • If your current vacuum leaves behind too much pet hair, follow up with a squeegee. Firmly scrape the rubber end along the top of your carpet to gather all the fur remnants, repeating as necessary.
  • To quickly remove pet hair from upholstered furniture, put on a pair of lightly dampened rubber dishwashing gloves. Run your gloved hands over the fabric to collect the hair, rinsing and repeating as often as necessary.
  • Reduce shedding by frequently brushing your pet, keeping his coat clipped short, or using a de-shedding tool.

There’s no getting around the fact that a majority of dogs and cats shed copious amounts of fur throughout the year, but that doesn’t mean your furniture and carpets have to be permanently coated in pet hair. Using separate pet beds, buying a good vacuum cleaner, and maintaining a regular grooming schedule are just a few tips you can try for preventing and removing pet hair buildup.

Pet Safety for the Holidays

dog-in-christmas-lights-480x300Festive decorations, tempting foods, and heaping piles of presents are just a few of the things that make the holiday season special. But while these Christmas staples are pleasing to humans, they can pose unique dangers to household pets. So as you go about decking the halls, trimming the tree, and whipping up tasty treats, keep the following pet safety tips in mind:

  • When decorating your home with traditional Christmas plants such as mistletoe, poinsettia, and holly, keep them off the ground and well out of the way of pets. These plants and their leaves/berries are toxic to dogs and cats, and may cause mild to severe vomiting, diarrhea, and other intestinal problems if eaten.
  • Cover or hide any extra electrical cords used to power holiday lights, moving figures, and similar decor, especially if your pet is a chewer. Pets can receive electrical shocks or tongue lacerations if they break through the outer coating and expose the internal wires of electrical cords. (If you can’t keep cords out of reach, we carry the CritterCord Cord Protector at CozyWinters.com.)
  • Beware of placing shiny ornaments or long strands of tinsel on the lower branches of your Christmas tree. These items can be very alluring to curious pets, but are a serious choking hazard.
  • Do not leave burning candles unattended in any room. It’s all too easy for a dog or cat to burn its whiskers, tail, or paws while passing by or inadvertently knock over a candle and perhaps start a fire.
  • Refrain from giving your pet holiday treats containing chocolate, certain nuts (including walnuts, almonds, and macadamia nuts), and raw eggs or nutmeg (think eggnog), all of which can cause a variety of health issues ranging from upset stomach to tremors, seizures, and abnormal behavior.
  • Do not allow pets to play with gift wrapping accessories such as ribbons and bows since these items can cause intestinal blockage if swallowed.
  • If traveling with your pet, make sure they are kept secure while in moving vehicles.

The holidays are a time for celebrating with family and loved ones, including pets. If you have dogs, cats, or other furry creatures in your home, take extra care to keep them safe amidst all of these seasonal hazards.

Happy Outdoor Pets in Winter

Keeping pets safe and happy in winter requires more effort than at other times of the year. That’s primarily because this season is fraught with a variety of hazards that can cause serious illness or injury for your furry companions, up to and including death. To help ensure your pets get through the winter in perfect health, try these useful tips:


For outdoor pets

  • happy outdoor dogs heated pet bedProvide easy access to some kind of enclosed shelter – such as a barn, garage, or doghouse – that can offer protection from wind, snow, and freezing rain.
  • Place a pet bed or plenty of clean, dry straw in the shelter to give your animal a comfortable means of warming itself. Consider using a heated dog bed or a hot water bottle for instant warmth on the coldest nights.
  • Prevent drinking water from freezing in subzero temps by using a heated pet bowl or providing running water.
  • Increase your pet’s daily food rations to compensate for the extra energy required to stay warm in winter. The actual amount needed depends on a variety of factors, including activity level, breed, and shelter conditions, so consult a vet for best results.
  • Refrain from clipping, trimming, or shaving your pet’s coat until the weather warms up again. This will provide the animal with a natural layer of protection against the elements.
  • Bring your pet into your house when dangerous storms or unusually heavy snowfall are predicted.

 

For indoor pets going outdoors

  • Dress smaller, more delicate dogs in a sweater or jacket before going out for a walk. If there is snow and/or salt on the ground, use pet booties to protect the animal’s tender paws.
  • Keep walks and outings shorter than usual to help limit exposure to the elements.
  • Do not leave pets in an unattended car for extended periods. Just as in summer, the effects of extreme temperatures are exacerbated within the confines of a closed vehicle.
  • Keep animals away from antifreeze that has leaked and accumulated in garages or driveways. Antifreeze is tempting to dogs in particular because of its sweet taste, but is incredibly toxic to them.

 

Surviving the various dangers posed by winter weather can be challenging for even the toughest outdoor pets. Make things easier on them by providing adequate food, water, shelter, warming products, and care throughout the season.

Top Holiday Gift Ideas for 2014

heated apparel heated pet beds christmas giftsWith Black Friday and Cyber Monday looming, it’s time for the annual CozyWinters Holiday Gift Guide. Here are some of our top-selling heated products of 2014 for you to consider as you jump into the holiday shopping season.

 

For the home

  • Heated chair cover: With four heat settings, automatic shut-off, non-slip back, and a generous 72” cord length, this oversized heated chair cover is great for instantly warming a favorite recliner, rocking chair, or armchair.
  • Rug heat pad: Banish chilly floors and cold feet with this portable heat pad. It fits under area rugs or carpets to provide warmth and coziness to living rooms, playrooms, TV rooms, and bedrooms. Pets love it too!
  • Foot of the bed warmer: For some folks a full-sized heated mattress pad or electric blanket isn’t necessary for getting a good night’s sleep. Instead, they can take comfort in something as simple as an electric foot of the bed warmer to keep toes toasty without heating the entire sleeping surface.

 

For the animal lover

  • Heated dog pad: Even the hardiest dog breeds face health risks when kept outdoors in winter, which is why a heated dog pad from Lectro-Soft would make a welcome gift for the pet lover on your list. This pad uses very low wattage to produce life-saving warmth for pets staying in doghouses, basements, barns, and garages.
  • Heated cat bed: A soft orthopedic base, removable heater, and washable cover make this heated cat bed an attractive retreat for even the most finicky feline.
  • Heated pet bowl: If your dog’s water bowl consistently freezes over in winter, then this needs to be at the top of your wish list. The bowl comes with a chew-resistant cord and plugs into any standard outlet to keep water drinkable even when temperatures drop below zero.

 

For the sports fan

  • Heated stadium seat cushion: Football games, hunting blinds, camping, and other outdoor pursuits will be a lot more comfortable with our heated stadium seat cushion. These lightweight, battery-operated pads heat to around 120 degrees and provide up to five hours of warmth per charge.
  • All-purpose heated gloves: Three heat settings, adjustable neoprene wrist cuffs, and no-slip palms make these gloves ideal for a variety of light outdoor activities such as walking or shoveling snow.
  • Boot & glove dryer: The skiers and snowboarders on your list will appreciate the convenience of this quick-working, four-pronged boot & glove dryer from DryGuy. It heats up enough to kill odors and dry garments in about an hour without getting so hot as to damage boot or glove liners.

 

We also offer CozyWinters gift certificates in denominations ranging from $25 to $500, so head on over to our site right now to begin shopping for everyone on your holiday list.

 

The Dangers of Leaving Pets in Hot Cars

hot carIt’s natural to want to take your dog or cat with you when you go on a long road trip, spend a day at the beach, or simply run errands around town. After all, pets are an important part of the family, and it wouldn’t be the same to do these things without them.

However, driving with a pet can lead to some dangerous situations, particularly when you have to enter a store, restaurant, or other establishment where animals are not allowed. You may be tempted to just crack the windows and take care of your business while Fido hangs out in the car, but this is an extremely risky move that should be avoided when the weather warms up. Consider the following:

  • Even with the windows cracked, it takes mere minutes for the temperature inside a parked vehicle to surpass 100 degrees on an 85-degree day.
  • Your parked car is not safer for your pet just because you’ve had the air conditioner on recently. As soon as you turn the AC off to go inside, the interior temperature will immediately begin to rise.
  • While cooling pet products (such as the Hound Cooler Pet Bed) do provide comfort in hot conditions, they do not reduce the dangers of heat stroke or death under such extreme conditions as leaving your pet in a locked car. These products are meant to provide cooling in survivable conditions only, where there is sufficient air-flow for ventilation and preferably access to shade or cover.
  • You never know what might happen to delay you on your errand. Something you thought would take only a few minutes could suddenly end up taking twenty or more, causing your pet to suffer.

Despite the well-known dangers of leaving pets in parked vehicles in hot weather, thousands of owners do it every year – usually because they are merely not aware of the real risks. If you come across a dog or cat in obvious distress in a locked vehicle, please take action using one or more of the following suggestions:

  • If you witness someone begin to leave their dog in a locked car, offer to hold the dog on its leash outside the car while the owner completes their errand.
  • If the car is in a parking lot, you can ask customer service/the front desk of nearby buildings to make an announcement for the owner to return to their car.
  • You can call the local Humane enforcement, police, or animal control authorities (be ready to give the make, model, color, and license plate of the car).
  • If you do not know the number for local or specialized authorities, PETA recommends that you call 911 to report the offense and wait on the scene until responders arrive.
  • Be aware of any local, state, and federal laws that may outlaw “reasonable force” by civilians (such as breaking into a car to rescue a pet in distress) prior to attempting rescue.

It’s perfectly possible for you to enjoy car trips with pets in warm or hot weather. Just make sure you do so responsibly by never leaving a dog or cat alone in a parked vehicle. As a general rule, if you or a child would be uncomfortable or at risk due to the temperature, so would your pet.

How to Keep Your Dog Safe in the Water

The warm spring sun makes May an ideal month for getting out of the house with your dog to enjoy activities such as early morning jogs, Frisbee sessions at the park, and excursions to the beach, lake, or river.

While canine safety is not such an issue during park play or on-leash jogging, it is a major concern whenever water is involved. That’s because just like humans, not all dogs have equal swimming abilities or endurance levels. Plus, accidents and injuries are always a possibility, which is why you need to be prepared for anything. So before you head out on the water with your canine companion, read these tips about how to keep your dog safe:

  • Never let your dog play in the water unsupervised – keep him in sight at all times
  • Regardless of swimming ability, always use a canine life jacket (such as the Paws  Aboard model sold at CozyWinters) to protect against danger due to fear, cramps, exhaustion, or other problemsDog-Life-Jacket
  • Be aware of others nearby that may pose an unintentional risk to your pet – such as children, other dogs, or boats
  • Provide your dog with a shaded rest area and give him plenty of breaks throughout the day. If not swimming in fresh water, be sure to provide some to drink regularly
  • Use a doggy boat ladder, pool ramp, or similar product to give your pet a safe and easy way to exit the water by himself (available at CozyWinters)
  • Rinse your dog’s coat after a day in the water to remove any salt, chlorine, or other impurities that may cause discomfort or skin problems
  • Be sure to thoroughly dry your pet’s ears to prevent possible infection

One of the supreme joys of dog ownership is being able to spend quality time with your pet during your regular hobbies. If your plans for this spring and summer include frolicking in the water, keep the above safety tips in mind so you can protect your beloved canine companion from danger.

Ways to Prevent Pets from Chewing Electrical Cords

chewing wiresEveryone knows that pets have a knack for getting into trouble around the house. Whether it’s snagging an unguarded bit of food from the dinner table or turning a brand-new leather loafer into a very expensive chew toy, dogs and cats of all ages and discipline levels are capable of causing their owners some anguish from time to time.

While most pet capers result in nothing more than annoyance, there’s real danger involved where electrical cords are concerned. That’s because chewing through connected electrical cables or wiring not only compromises high-priced products such televisions and computers, but also poses a significant risk of shock, fire, or even death.

As a responsible owner, you’ll want to safeguard your precious pets as well as your expensive gear by doing one or more of the following:

  • Remove temptation by unplugging unnecessary cords and storing them away
  • Where possible, run necessary cables and wires behind sofas, shelves, and furniture so they’ll be out of your pet’s reach
  • Use a protective cover on exposed cables, such as the CritterCord Cord Protector available at CozyWinters.com
  • Use adhesive hooks and similar types of cord keepers that attach to walls so wires remain off the ground
  • Gather exposed cabling together behind a raceway or channel
  • Cover cords with double-sided tape to keep cats away
  • Make your electrical cables literally distasteful by lightly coating them with hot sauce, vinegar, chili paste, or something equally repugnant to pets
  • Remain extra vigilant in winter, when you tend to have more cords out because of Christmas lights, decorations, electric blankets, etc

It’s not possible to shield pets from every potential hazard in your home, but you can at least make sure they don’t have easy access to electrical cords. Take the above precautions today to protect your beloved companions from serious injury.

Winter Storm Safety Tips

stormFor the most part, winter is a glorious season that gives rise to gleaming white landscapes and gorgeous days filled with skiing, sledding, trekking, and snowboarding.

But winter can also be extremely dangerous, especially when massive storms bring heavy snowfall and subzero temperatures to large areas of the country. For an example of this, look no further than the havoc created by winter storm Hercules in the Midwest and Northeast a few days ago.

If you live in a place that is vulnerable to fierce storms like Hercules, it’s critical that you maintain your home in a state of readiness so you can increase your chances of surviving whatever ordeal may come your way. Here are a few important tips for what to do before and during winter storms.

Before the storm
Make sure you have the following items on hand well before any big storm is predicted or announced by the weather service:

  • Three-day supply of drinking water for each person in your household (to be calculated as one gallon per person per day)
  • Three-day supply of MREs, energy bars, canned goods, or other easy-to-prepare, nonperishable food items
  • Extra winter clothing for each person, including hats, coats, gloves, and boots
  • Extra blankets
  • Flashlights with fresh batteries
  • First-aid kit and medications
  • Battery-operated or hand-cranked radio for news updates and announcements
  • Pet supplies and pet food, if necessary
  • Alternative heating source, such as a wood-burning stove or fireplace (for safety reasons, avoid using gas or propane grills indoors)
  • Cash for emergency purchases

During the storm
Once a major storm hits, take the following actions to ensure your family’s safety:

  • Stay indoors as much as possible and avoid driving
  • If your home loses power or becomes structurally unsound, go to the nearest public shelter
  • Keep the thermostat set to at least 55 degrees–even overnight–to help prevent pipes from freezing and bursting
  • Bring pets inside or provide them with access to a sturdy shelter
  • When going outdoors, guard against hypothermia by dressing in battery-heated clothing such as vests, jackets, and gloves
  • As soon as conditions permit, check on elderly, disabled, or homebound individuals in your neighborhood
  • In the event of a power outage, use your radio to keep aware of official information

Being prepared with the right supplies and knowing what to do when a major winter storm hits are the biggest keys to outwitting Mother Nature, so keep the above tips in mind and stay safe out there!